CCC '06 J2 - Roll the Dice

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Points: 3
Time limit: 2.0s
Memory limit: 64M

Problem type
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Canadian Computing Competition: 2006 Stage 1, Junior #2

Diana is playing a game with two dice. One die has m sides labelled 1, 2, 3, \dots, m.

The other die has n sides labelled 1, 2, 3, \dots, n.

Write a program to determine how many ways can she roll the dice to get the sum 10.

For example, when the first die has 6 sides and the second die has 8 sides, there are 5 ways to get the sum 10:

  • 2 + 8 = 10
  • 3 + 7 = 10
  • 4 + 6 = 10
  • 5 + 5 = 10
  • 6 + 4 = 10

Input

The input is given as two integers. First, the user will enter in the number m (1 \le m \le 1000).

Second, the user will enter the number n (1 \le n \le 1000).

Output

The program prints out the number of ways 10 may be rolled on these two dice. Note that in the output, the word "way" should be used if there is only one way to achieve the sum of 10; otherwise, the word "ways" should be used in the output. That is, if there is only one way to get the sum 10, the output should be:

There is 1 way to get the sum 10.

Sample Input 1

6
8

Sample Output 1

There are 5 ways to get the sum 10.

Sample Input 2

12
4

Sample Output 2

There are 4 ways to get the sum 10.

CCC problem statements in large part from the PEG OJ


Comments


  • 2
    ghost  commented on Nov. 9, 2019, 8:38 p.m.

    Does this problem involve counting 4 + 6 as the same as 6 + 4 even if the numbers are on different dice?


    • -4
      Tzak  commented on Nov. 9, 2019, 9:03 p.m.

      4 + 6 and 6 + 4 are considered to be different, as described in the problem statement. The problem in your code lies elsewhere -- consider the following test case:

      3 11

      The expected output is:

      There are 3 ways to get the sum 10.

  • 8
    Narcariel  commented on Sept. 26, 2019, 8:17 p.m.

    Watch out, if there is only one way it must be one WAY, if there are more ways, then it has to be WAYS with an s.


    • 2
      Davy_Chu  commented on Nov. 19, 2019, 4:06 p.m.

      or if there are 0 ways, I forgot to make a value for that and was stuck for a while


  • 2
    WEAVER  commented on May 6, 2019, 6:29 p.m.

    i always mess up on the grammar because they are soooooo specific.


  • 4
    AyoubIzzet123  commented on April 2, 2019, 3:17 p.m.

    I realized this after doing the code, the test cases don't account for the fact that some of the combinations are identical i.e 6 + 4 = 10 and 4 + 6 = 10!


    • 1
      Subway_Man  commented on Sept. 19, 2020, 11:24 p.m.

      This is intentional. In probability, they are considered 2 different outcomes. Consider that rolling a 2, with two fair six sided dice, is less likely to appear than 3 since 3 can be obtained two ways and 2 only one.


  • 3
    Jacob_Tian  commented on Oct. 14, 2018, 8:45 p.m.

    i know i messed up so much because of the grammar. :(


    • 2
      Arihan10  commented on Jan. 22, 2019, 1:55 p.m. edited

      Me too :(

      Couldn't figure out why I was getting WA.


  • 9
    ArtyKing12  commented on July 4, 2018, 12:02 p.m.

    Did you know that 8!/2/10 = 2016? Figured that out while making an equation for the program


  • 17
    TimothyW553  commented on Dec. 22, 2017, 6:24 p.m.

    Heck the grammar >:(